Events

April
25
Friday
1:00pm—4:00pm

Dept. of Speech & Hearing Sciences
2115 G Street NW
Hall of Government 201
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-7362
Fax: 202-994-2589
gwusphr@gwu.edu


Speech and Hearing Center
2115 G Street NW
Hall of Government B01
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-7360
Fax: 202-994-0747

Department of Speech and Hearing Science

The most human of all attributes is the ability to communicate. The professions of audiology and speech-language pathology seek to understand this ability, the consequences of impairments in the ability to communicate, and the rehabilitation of those individuals who have a communication impairment. The disciplines encompass the developmental, physiological, cognitive, neurological, and pragmatic aspects of human communication.

The Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences provides undergraduate and graduate programs focused on engaging students in the acquisition and application of knowledge of human communication and its disorders. Whether learning about communication sciences or the relationship between language and society, students studying speech and hearing sciences receive in-depth knowledge of all aspects of communication, including the consequences of speech and hearing challenges on individuals and society and the treatment of communication impairments.

The department encourages student-faculty partnerships as part of its mission to educate students, promote a culture of research in speech and hearing, and provide the best services possible through the Speech and Hearing Center. The department's location in the heart of Washington, D.C., affords students the opportunity to be placed in nationally renowned hospitals and clinics and public school systems.

James Mahshie

Meet the Department Chair

Professor and Chair of the Department James Mahshie is an expert in the areas of deafness, aerodynamic studies of voice and speech production, and the acoustic analysis of speech. His research involves exploration of various aspects of speech production and perception by deaf and hard of hearing individuals.